BUILDING FINE ART COLLECTIONS SINCE 1965

2018

 

MILT KOBAYASHI
March 3 - 31, 2018
Artist’s Reception / Saturday, March 3 / 5 - 7 pm

Mr. Kobayashi will be on hand for the Opening Reception set for Saturday, March 3, from 5 to 7 pm.  Gallery Shoal Creek has represented Milt Kobayashi since 1984, hosting his first solo exhibition outside of New York City in 1989. Over the years, he has garnered national and international attention. The gallery is proud to be a part of the legacy that Mr. Kobayashi has established, placing his work in private collections across the US, Canada, and the UK.

The Artist and His Work
Milt Kobayashi seeks to capture fleeting moments of everyday life. Spontaneity and gestural expressions define his paintings. Brevity of brush stroke gives an illusion of simplicity, highlighting only that which is essential. One stroke less and the subject is void of structure, one stroke more and the painting is chaotic. His compositions are dominated by quiet moments. “For inspiration, I will memorize scenes, store them in my memory and then distill them down to the most important elements. It may be a shadow, a scene from a movie, or the way light hits the face of a stranger walking down the street.” In talking with students, he stresses Degas’ belief that “relying on memory as opposed to copying a scene or event stimulates the creative process. In this manner, you only reproduce what has stuck with you, that is to say, the essential . . . your memories and fantasies are freed from the tyranny which nature holds on them.”

After graduating from UCLA, Kobayashi settled in New York in 1977 to begin a career in illustration; soon he realized that his narrative style would not meet the constraints of commercial art. At the Metropolitan Museum of Art, a painting by Velazquez – the portrait of his long-time assistant Juan de Pareja (1650) – pushed him toward fine art. From here he studied and was influenced by other masters such as Sargent, Chase, and Duvanek. Even today, as a highly successful painter, he returns often to spend time with the artists of the 18th and 19th century who have inspired his work.

A third-generation Japanese-American, Milt Kobayashi masterfully blends the aesthetics of the east and the west. His work is reflective of the significant influence that the arts of Japan had on those working in Paris in the late 19th century. Artists such as Whistler, Bonnard, Vuillard and Toulouse-Lautrec embraced Japonism during this period.

Kobayashi, too, was drawn to the traditions of Ukiyo-e wood block prints. Ukiyo-e, or "floating world", refers to the young culture that bloomed in cities like Edo, now Tokyo, in the 1700s. The prints depicted this urban lifestyle, scenes from the entertainment districts, beautiful courtesans and popular actors. 

Kobayashi’s distinct style also adopts the compositional freedoms introduced by Ukiyo-e masters. Subjects are placed off center, silhouetted and cropped. There is light without shadows, flat areas of strong color, patterned surfaces and contrasting voids. Kobayashi has found a way to blend strong design aesthetic with an intimate characterization of his subject.

high-resolution image:
Milt Kobayashi / Wistful

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Milt Kobayashi / Wistful
Oil on canvas / 10" x 10"

 

 

 

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KARINA NOEL HEAN
STRATA / Prints and Drawings
January 12 - February 17, 2018
Artist’s Reception / Friday, January 12 / 6 - 8 pm

Gallery Shoal Creek, in conjunction with PrintAustin 2018, presents an exhibition of prints and drawings by New Mexico artist Karina Noel Hean. 

Grounded in drawing, Hean explores responses to the landscape. She points out that “the dislocated landscapes in this exhibition are like us, accumulations of experiences, interactions, weather -- stacked and layered as sediment revealing residual effects of change. Both the woodcut and intaglio prints and large and small scale drawings contain a layering of time, memory, and mark.” 

Karina Noel Hean is based in Santa Fe, NM, where she balances teaching and creating her own art. She teaches at the New Mexico School for the Arts, where she chairs the Visual Arts Department. Hean has a BA from St. Johns College, a Post-Baccalaureate Certificate from Studio Art Centers International, and her MFA from New Mexico State University. Hean received an American Artist Fellowship at the Ballinglen Arts Foundation, Ireland, and has completed several artist-in-residencies in the U.S. Her work has been exhibited in solo and group exhibitions throughout the U.S.

PrintAustin 2018 is a month long celebration of the art of original Printmaking.  With exhibitions, events, and workshops, the city-wide PrintAustin showcases the innovations and traditions of  Contemporary Printmaking.  

high-resolution image:
Karina Noel Hean / Tangled Up VI

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Karina Noel Hean / Tangled Up VI
Graphite and charcoal / 48" x 48"

 



 

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2017

 

TONY SALADINO
October 20 - November 22, 2017

Sound in Time / Marks in Space
When sound becomes music and marks become art we can see and feel the effect of shared experience.

Tony Saladino has always felt a deep connection between music and the art that emerges from his creative process. In a series of 12 new works on canvas, the artist explores this connectivity.

The exhibition opens on Friday, October 20 at Gallery Shoal Creek with a reception for the artist and will be on view through November 22. Mr. Saladino and gallery owner Judith Taylor have worked closely together for over twenty-five years. While color has always been at the heart of Saladino's works—whether on canvas or paper—his mark marking has evolved from highly structured to loose and gestural.

 

high-resolution image:
Tony Saladino / Firebird

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Tony Saladino / Firebird
Acrylic / 54" x 50"

 

 

 

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KAREN HAWKINS
KOICHI YAMAMOTO
August 18 - September 30, 2017

Gallery Shoal Creek launches the fall season with solo exhibitions featuring two noted artists who have an established association with the gallery: KAREN HAWKINS and KOICHI YAMAMOTO. Exploration and experimentation dominate as each artist has developed a highly personal visual language and expresses devotion to a singular medium with infinite variations.

KAREN HAWKINS / How Many Journeys?
Holding a vintage book, Karen Hawkins is drawn to the sensory qualities of the volume and wonders, "how many journeys has this book taken?"   In our digital age, books are rapidly becoming objects on a shelf. As an artist, Hawkins' goal is to propel the objectivity of each decommissioned book by transforming and reinterpreting its form. In deconstructing and constructing, Hawkins creates meandering, organic forms—each with a meditative aspect. Recent jelly roll assemblages are rendered in un-dyed, natural tones of aged paper while sculpted book forms are presented as hanging pillars as well as wall installations.

"I begin by expanding the physical properties of the book: folding, cutting and excavating it, rendering each page largely unreadable, and each book shifts into an object, not of literature or science or history any longer, but an object of art. As the meaning of each book is subjugated to this objectification process, a shifting beauty transpires, aside from any language or text or etching held between the endpapers. As the type transforms from a recognizable symbol to a simple visual mark, it no longer references a known cue, but introduces a new, visual language."

Karen Hawkins is a graduate of the University of Texas Austin Fine Arts program and lives and works in Austin. She is active in the city's art community and currently serves on the Board of Trustees of The Contemporary Austin.

KOICHI YAMAMOTO / New Territory
Engraving has been a primary medium in Eastern Europe for centuries, and it was there that artist Koichi Yamamoto's interest in it began. The intense physicality and slowness of this specific intaglio process resonated with the highly skilled printmaker. The last five years of the artist's practice has been devoted to developing a unique technique of creating bisymmetrical imagery via traditionally engraved copper plates. The current exhibition highlights the new territory into which this important artist has ventured both physically and creatively.

This spring, while on sabbatical from his teaching position at the University of Tennessee Knoxville, Yamamoto had the opportunity to pursue his printmaking at three very different residencies, each of which broadened the scope of his work. On Kauai Island in Hawaii, the artist incorporated images from naval architecture. The winds of the Mojave Desert inspired the artist to create kites out of his prints while at Joshua Tree National Park. Research into Moorish architecture in Southern Spain and Morocco led Yamamoto to incorporate color into his oeuvre. In reference to the collective experiences, he notes, "To share and to communicate requires a vehicle. Kites are my vehicle and printmaking my language."

Koichi Yamamoto, born and raised in Japan, came to the U.S. as a high school student. He currently teaches at the University of Tennessee Knoxville where he is Associate Professor in Printmaking in the College of Arts and Sciences. He is a graduate of the University of Alberta (MFA 1999) and Pacific Northwest College of Art (BFA 1992). His work is recognized internationally, and he maintains an active exhibition schedule in the U.S. and abroad.

high-resolution images:
Karen Hawkins / Jelly Rolls
Karen Hawkins / Sculpted Book Forms

Koichi Yamamoto / Kite Flying at Joshua Tree National Park
Koichi Yamamoto / Floating Architecture Series no. 25

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Karen Hawkins / Jelly Rolls
Rolled book pages

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Karen Hawkins / Sculpted Book Forms

 

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Koichi Yamamoto / Kite flying at Joshua Tree National Park

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Koichi Yamamoto / Floating Architecture Series no. 25
intaglio / 16 x 20 inches

 

 

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JILL LEAR
Spontaneity within Structure
May 19 - June 24, 2017

Jill Lear is known for her large-scale mixed media renderings of magnificent trees identified by their coordinates. In these, she expresses the landscape as a particular, defined and measured place.

"It starts with a single tree in the landscape, assigned its latitude and longitude," notes the artist. "Then the investigation begins. A transcription of not only the experience of being in and thinking about Nature, but also about the way in which we process the world around us, literally."

Lear's charcoal lines and graphite marks on paper "serve not only as outline of form but as a map delineating the tracks of trunks and branches, serving as descriptors of volume," writes Kristin Poole. She wants us to see not just a tree but "thickness, areas of light and the energy where lines intersect. She asks us to see form but also the spaces between forms."

high-resolution image:
Jill Lear / Erythrina Caffra XLIV

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Jill Lear / Erythrina Caffra XLIV
Mixed media on paper on 4 panels / 60 x 44 in.

 

 

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PrintAustin 2017
KAREN KUNC + MONIKA MELER
January 13 - February 18, 2017

A spectrum of color and light connects Karen Kunc's woodcuts and Monika Meler's relief prints in this two-person exhibition. The span of time is central to both artists' imagery. For Kunc, the natural world is where she finds inspiration; Meler draws on place—referencing memories of her childhood in Poland and her immigration to the U.S.  Strong visual imagery and technical fluency have brought each artist international recognition in printmaking.

KAREN KUNC is the Willa Cather Professor of Art at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln and is internationally known for her large scale, elaborately colored woodcut prints. Her imagery incorporates richly hued shapes with timeless textural language, leading to a sense of intimacy and detail, with the tactile resonance of wood, paper and impression.

MONIKA MELER's selected works for the exhibition focus on Collected Memories and include several different print processes - diffused relief print, monotypes, and handcut stencil relief prints. Monika is an Assistant Professor of Art at the University of the Pacific in Stockton, California.

high-resolution images:
Karen Kunc / Place Naming
Monika Meler / The Tower

 

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Karen Kunc / Place Naming

 

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Monika Meler / The Tower

2016

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SHAWN CAMP / Angle of Refraction
November 12 through December 17, 2016

In recent bodies of work, Shawn Camp has migrated from large abstract imagery rendered in an impasto style to an exploration of smooth, almost metallic surfaces based on oblique rectangles, linear edges that cut across the panel, and the refractive qualities of light. The transition evolved out of Camp’s earlier light box installations that combined palette knife impasto mark-making on plexiglass with an underside of glazed colors that allowed patterns of light to stream through.

In his artist statement, Camp describes the interactive nature of the engaging new work featured in this show: "These are paintings that place the viewer in a contradictory sense of space and color through countless layers of thinly glazed transparent pigment. Their meditative, expansive surfaces convey a sense of atmosphere and depth that mitigates the physical reality of the paintings themselves. The subtle refractive quality of the transparent layers of color transform as the viewing angle changes - a symbolic parallax that reveals itself over the course of time."

The current series, Angle of Refraction, explores in depth these smooth, glazed surfaces broken by masked-out shapes and lines. To achieve the glass-like sheen, Camp builds layer upon layer of transparent paint. Applied by brush, the glazed surface is sanded repeatedly throughout the entire process. A single layer "does almost nothing," says Camp. "It's only after 20 or 30 layers that you start to see the subtle complexity of the colors."

Camp received his MFA in Painting from Virginia Commonwealth University in Richmond, Virginia, after completing a BFA in Painting and BS in Psychology from The University of Idaho. He currently teaches Painting at The School of Art and Design at Texas State University.

The exhibition is presented in conjunction with EAST 2016
November 12-13 & 19-20 from 11am-6pm

high-resolution images:
The Absolute of the Mystics
The Angle of Incidence

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Shawn Camp / The Absolute of the Mystics

 

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Shawn Camp / The Angle of Incidence

 

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triptych: a set of three artistic views to be appreciated together
MARC BURCKHARDT + KEN HALE + KIRK TATOM
October 21 through November 19, 2016

The gallery will showcase the most recent work of three featured artists: Marc Burckhardt, Ken Hale and Kirk Tatom. The audience is invited to view the presentation as three distinct exhibitions and explore the themes, references, and stylistic elements adopted by each artist in triptych: a set of three artistic views to be appreciated together.

 

MARC BURCKHARDT / Allegorical Narratives

Marc Burckhardt's paintings are simultaneously foreign and familiar. Influenced by German Renaissance masters, his poignant work explores private realities and universal themes, as in Fates, which like all of the artist’s imagery challenges the viewer's perceptions. Burckhardt's recent works include those inspired by literature and mythology, including Petrarch’s Triumphs, the lyrical poem from the early Italian Renaissance. Working between studios in Austin, Texas, and Bremen, Germany, his extensive research has led to a series of allegorical paintings that reflect his personal connection to classical themes.

 

KEN HALE / Earthly Delights

In Hale's 2016 series Earthly Delights, floral motifs and the painterly gouache monotype process create beautiful, intricate and tactile images. The juxtaposition of diverse imagery forces the viewer to study both the strange familiarity and aestheticism of each piece through references to European masters of the 15th–18th centuries. The matte floral compositions are superimposed over glossy computer manipulated reproductions of old master paintings by Rubens, Bosch, Cole, Brueghel and others, adding a conundrum for the viewer who attempts to decipher the works. The series title is derived from Hieronymus Bosch's Garden of Earthly Delights.

 

KIRK TATOM / Seam of Light

Kirk Tatom's artistic career merges the diverse skills he has mastered. For nearly 20 years, he was one of the foremost carvers of stone in Santa Fe. In 1997 he put down the chisel and picked up the paint brush. A sculptural spirit remains in his paintings, seen especially in the carved outline of a stream or the rugged cracks of a cliff. Drawn to the tranquility of place, his compositions gravitate to rural picturesque landscapes while light illuminates the tonal nature of his work. Process, derived from his early training as a printmaker, drives his approach. He spends hours setting the mood as he prepares the under layers with glowing, translucent surfaces. The darker, highly saturated color is applied last, creating the detail and providing those hints of form that reference his talents as a stone carver. Tatom resides in southern Arizona and spends part of the year traveling and painting in California.

high-resolution images:
Marc Burckhardt / Fates
Ken Hale / Earthly Delights 2
Kirk Tatom / Waiting for the Sun

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Marc Burckhardt / Fates

 

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Ken Hale / Earthly Delights 2

 

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Kirk Tatom / Waiting for the Sun

 

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RENÉ ALVARADO
September 16 through October 29, 2016

As an artist, Alvarado returns to the cultural narratives of his childhood. His imagery embraces the symbolism, metaphors, folklore and traditional icons of his Mexican roots. Yet, "while he expresses these cultural identities, his work cannot be considered simply a form of regional expressionism," says Dr. Enrique Cortazar, former Director of the Instituto de Mexico in San Antonio. "Rather, thanks to the expressive depth and honest sensitivity, his work approaches a true universal dimension . . . within a language of forms, colors and artistic expression, [Alvarado] transports us from the flavor of locale to a universal perspective. Here borders do not exist."

Alvarado's visual narratives draw on his strong familial ties. Layer by layer, the metaphorical assemblage of color, texture and figural forms unveil a range of human emotions that instinctively flow from his creative process. Following the death of his father, he has explored how the absence of one affects those remaining. The Madonna figure assumes “the role of parental guidance while other imagery suggests the beautiful imprints of lessons my father shared. Organic references—a thread that runs throughout Alvarado's work—bring to mind his father's love of the botanical world of the desert terrain in his nature Mexico and that of his adopted landscape of West Texas.

high-resolution image:
Madagascar Cactus

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Madagascar Cactus
oil on canvas / 40 x 30 in.

 

 

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